Kimberley Martin - Homes of New Hampshire Realty

Posted by Kimberley Martin on 3/4/2018

Let's face it reviewing an offer to purchase can be difficult. And if a home seller feels unsure about a homebuying proposal, this individual may want to consider rejecting the offer to purchase.

Ultimately, there are many reasons why a home seller may decline an offer to purchase, and these include:

1. An offer to purchase fails to meet a home seller's expectations.

If a home seller receives a "lowball" offer to purchase, he or she may submit an instant rejection. In fact, this seller likely will have no regrets about declining the offer to purchase and continuing to wait for a homebuying proposal that matches his or her expectations.

As a home seller, it is vital to establish realistic property selling expectations before you list your residence. If you set a competitive initial asking price for your home, you may reduce the likelihood of getting lowball homebuying proposals. And as a result, you may be better equipped than ever before to speed up the home selling journey.

2. A home seller has multiple offers to purchase at his or her disposal.

If a home seller receives multiple offers to purchase his or her home, this individual likely has a tough decision to make. Fortunately, a seller can review his or her options and make an informed decision.

When a home seller receives several offers to purchase his or her residence, there is no need to rush to reject or accept a proposal. Instead, a seller should evaluate each homebuying proposal closely and use all of the information at his or her disposal to determine the best course of action.

3. A home seller can afford to wait.

If a home seller lists his or her residence in a buyer's market, the demand for houses may be limited. Conversely, if a seller lists a home in a seller's market, this individual may receive many offers to purchase as soon as his or her residence becomes available.

Sometimes, a home seller who can afford to be patient may choose to reject an offer to purchase in a buyer's market, even if the proposal is competitive. Because if the seller waits for the real estate market to improve, this individual may be able to optimize the value of his or her residence at a later time.

For home sellers who are committed to getting the best price for a home, it generally is a good idea to employ a real estate agent. This housing market professional will help a seller establish a competitive initial asking price for his or her residence. Plus, a real estate agent will set up open house events and home showings to promote this house to potential buyers. And if a seller receives an offer to purchase, a real estate agent can recommend whether the seller should reject, accept or counter the proposal.

Want to list your house and streamline the property selling journey? Hire a real estate agent, and you can work with a home selling expert to evaluate any offers to purchase your residence.

Posted by Kimberley Martin on 12/24/2017

The real estate market is filled with many high-quality residences, and after a comprehensive search, you've found a residence that fits your personal needs and budget perfectly. However, you may need to think twice before you submit an offer on this residence. There are many factors that homebuyers should consider before they make an offer on a house, including: 1. Neighborhood Ideally, you'll want to find a home in a community filled with friendly neighbors. But in many cases, homebuyers may focus exclusively on a residence and ignore the neighborhood entirely. Taking a walk around a neighborhood often allows you to get a better feel about what it is like to live in a neighborhood and may give you a chance to meet some of the neighbors as well. Also, a simple walk around the block will provide you with a better idea about whether a house's value may rise or fall in the foreseeable future. For instance, a neighborhood filled with houses with well-maintained front lawns, nearby parks and schools and other local amenities may prosper for years to come, and home values may rise in this neighborhood over the next few years. 2. Crime No one wants to live in an unsafe area, and you can learn about crime near a prospective home before you submit an offer on a residence. Contacting a local police station usually is a great idea for homebuyers who want to find out about crime statistics in a particular area. Furthermore, your real estate agent can provide insights into crime in a specific area and help you determine whether a particular house is the best option. 3. Traffic Although your dream home features all of the amenities you want, it might fail to provide you with quick, easy access to your office day after day. For example, traffic can be a problem if your house is located in or near a major city. And if you need to travel to work every day, it is important to understand how traffic could affect your daily commute. To better understand traffic patterns in a particular area, try driving to a residence at different times during the day. By doing so, you can learn about traffic patterns near a house and be better equipped to make a more informed decision about whether to submit an offer on a residence. 4. Taxes You've been pre-approved for a mortgage and have established a monthly budget for a new home, but taxes may vary depending on where you move. Thus, you'll want to learn as much as possible about potential taxes that you could face at a new residence before you submit an offer. Taxes may add up quickly, but homebuyers who budget accordingly can minimize the risk that they'll fall behind on tax bills. And with support from your real estate agent, you can learn about taxes that you may encounter if you purchase a particular residence. If you're fully satisfied with a residence after you consider the aforementioned factors, you'll be ready to submit an offer and move one step closer to moving into your dream house.

Kimberley Martin